Six Things You Should Know About Bunions

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bunion-surgery-factsDespite their rather cuddly name, bunions are sources of misery, both physical and mental, for millions of people. Bunions grow on the big toe, often in response to wearing shoes that are much too tight. This is why women suffer more from bunions than men do.

Though many people simply resign themselves to living with their bunions, people who want them removed are often apprehensive because of the many old wives’ tales that have grown up around bunions. Knowing the facts about bunions can go a long way in easing people’s anxieties about getting them removed. Here are six things people should know about bunions:

  1. Bunion surgery doesn’t need to be any more painful than any other type of foot surgery. It’s true that people may perceive more pain in their feet after surgery because of the blood flow and postoperative swelling, but the pain can be controlled.
  2. Though bunions can return after surgery, this isn’t inevitable. It’s especially unlikely if the person begins to wear shoes that support his or her feet.
  3. After bunion surgery, most patients aren’t burdened with having their foot in a cast and having to use crutches. Now, a person only need wear a surgical shoe for about a month and a half. However, if a bunion is very large and involves the bone, the doctor may choose to fuse the bones in the foot. This will necessitate a cast and crutches.
  4. Bunion surgery doesn’t require a person to be away from work for a long period of time. If a person has a desk job, he or she can be back at work within a fortnight. People who have jobs where they need to stand or walk for long periods will need a longer recovery time of about two months or so.
  5. Many surgeons won’t remove a bunion until it really starts to hurt. This is why most people want them removed in the first place.
  6. Removing a bunion doesn’t necessarily produce an unusually ugly scar. Nowadays, surgeons can use techniques that minimize scarring.

If you have any more questions regarding bunion treatment, contact the friendly staff at InMotion Foot & Ankle Specialists at (480) 948-2111.

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